Published: February 1, 2018

Nature Morte in the 15-16th centuries

In the 15-16th centuries still life paintings were widespread mainly as a part of pictural composition. It was separated in the independent genre in the XVII century in Holland. There still life was especially loved and appreciated. Dutches called it "stilleven" that meant "quiet life". The name reflected the love and very special attitude of the Dutch artists to the wonderful world of things.

Nature Morte in the 15-16th centuries

Banquet Still Life with a View onto a Landscape, Jan Davidsz. de Heem

But interest in still life appeared in the Dutch painting much earlier. Artists entered such details as flowers, fruits, vessels into surrounding of a religious scene. These objects helped to introduce something worldly, light and joyful in the image. So, Joos van Cleve (1464 apprx. 1540) in his composition "Mother and Child with Joseph" (the Hermitage, St. Petersburg) showed the cut orange and a small knife with the nacreous handle on a parapet, near barefoot legs of the baby Christ. Right there the blossoming aquilegia branch lies. While such detail as a carnation in hands of the Mother of God, makes symbolical sense, other objects presented on a picture for the only purpose to decorate it.


By PokerGirl  508 Views




- View Comments (19)

Similar articles:




    « Jean-Baptiste Valadie. Unusual female portraits, nu, ganre

    Portraits of elderly women »
    « Jean-Baptiste Valadie. Unusual female portraits, nu, ganre Portraits of elderly women »

    nu

    nu

    nu in mythology and poetry

    nu in mythology and poetry

    men's portraits 18th century
       
    myfology painting

    Romantic scenes

    Romantic scenes

    Oriental women

    oriental women in art of paintings