By AnnaDanko


Published: March 26, 2012

Portraits of famous people of Russia at the "Grandpersona"


Creative association "noosphere" will present on November 22 at the exhibition - sale of "Grandpersona" portraits of famous people of Russia. This is a charity event, which aims - to raise money for the restoration of the church Harlampievskaya. As the head of the exhibition center Teleinform them. Vitaly Rogal Hope Kuklin, the exhibition will be presented to more than 15 portraits. Among the VIP-persons depicted on polotkah Artists - Vladimir Putin, Yury knife, Boris Govorin, Viktor Vekselberg.

The idea of ​​charity was born after a previous draft of the creative unions, on the initiative of the Irkutsk TV "City" and the Gallery of Modern Art "noosphere" Irkutsk artists on the street Uritskogo painted portraits of the townspeople, and the money handed over to Father Basil for church purposes.

The concept of the exhibition, the organizers - Andrew Zhilin and Vladislav Nesynov called "reaktulizatsiyu portrait", ie, the revival of the genre with "new meanings and functional orientation." The authors of the charity project, believe that the fabrics of their characters - the people who determine the face of Irkutsk in the 21st century. "In the era of dofotograficheskuyu portrait served a very important political and cultural function. After the image on the film, in bronze or stone, the ruler of a visual broadcast power over his subjects. Wealthy and important persons retain their appearance for the story. We have heard the image, and we imagine we looked like Voltaire, Caesar, Louis, Charles the Great "- wrote the authors of the exhibition in the concept of" Grandpersony. "

/ / Teleinform
November 10, 2005





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